History of 2nd Street, Ogden, Utah

Stories of Bingham's Fort, Lynne, Five Points

1900 – present

Posted by weberhistory on March 31, 2012

The famous corner of Five Points c. 1935.

YESTERDAY: The famous corner of Five Points in the 1930s, SE corner of 2nd St. and Washington Blvd; the Southwell building is now 2 stories high due to a  fire on third floor; the building is more commonly known as Five Points Drug; an electric street car in foreground and cars on the left; photo Clyde Bramwell.

TODAY: SE corner of Washington Blvd. & 2nd St.

TODAY: SE corner of Washington Blvd. & 2nd St; photo 2014.

A BRIEF SUMMARY 1849-1900

At the turn of the century it was time to look back and celebrate how far the settlement had come in the span of fifty years. Fortified by a sense of gathering, the Mormon pioneers had settled successfully in the Five Points area, built Bingham’s Fort and maintained order during the invasion of Johnston’s army just ten years after their arrival. Twenty years after their arrival, the railroad spanned the nation, met in Utah and crossed through Lynne Precinct.  Following the railroad were 20 years of tension between the Mormons and the gentiles over the issue of polygamy which ended in the 1890 Manifesto.   There were advantages that came with the railroad: economic stability and finally statehood in 1896, almost fifty years after the arrival of the earliest pioneers. By 1900 there were three political parties and three churches at Five Points. Individual choices of politics and religion were respected, and free education had been available for the last ten yearsThe hub at Five Points had many businesses with electric cars passing each way every few minutes.

In 1900 the members of the Lynne Literary and Debate Society were young men of various religions who were interested in the arts of debating, public speaking and cultural refinement.   However, they voted to not admit ladies to their society.  In 1910 Harrop & Aadneson publicized the business area of Five Points by getting a direct wire report at their saloon of the Jeffries-Johnson fight in Reno. There was a prevailing optimism in the community because Five Points had become a successful business district.[70a]

On the down side, there were five saloons at Five Points giving it a reputation for being a tough place. Arch Clapier started school in 1907 and use to run down during noon hour and gather the beer and whiskey bottles from the back of the saloon and trade them to the grocery store for candy. He said that the men came from Ogden to Five Points to get drunk.

The prestigious Ogden Military Acadamy north of the Points gave way after seven  years to the reform school.  Some didn’t like the reputation that the Utah State Industrial School gave to the north part of town beginning in 1896.  At the beginning of the Twentieth Century the reform school didn’t fortify the hopeful idea for Five Points to continue growing into Ogden’s biggest business district.  The reform school remained in operation for the the next 87 years, closing in 1983.

FARMIMG

In 1900 farming around Five Points was just as successful as the booming business district. Both gentile and Mormon farmers sought farm based economic stability and family values. The farmers shared farm work and machinery and became friendly gentile-Mormon groups. The pioneers had settled the farms on the west side of Five Points in the 1850s and 1860s. Scandinavian immigrants had settled bench farms on the east side of Lynne in the 1870s and 1880s. These farms now contributed significantly to Weber County agricultural economics.

Stone Farm west side of Five Points; Chauncey Stone plowing; photo c. 1915.

Stone Farm on west side of Five Points now encompassed the old Bingham Farm ; Chauncey Stone plowing; photo c. 1915.

Peter Petersen farm, east side Five Points; photo c. 1916.

Peter Petersen farm, east side Five Points; photo c. 1916.

Sugar beets, dairying, truck farms, orchards and canneries around Five Points flourished after the turn of the century. The 2nd Street railroad spur fortified the growth of canneries and the quick transportation of fresh produce.   The harvest season was a time of high activity around “The Points”.  Arch D. Clapier declared, “It was always exciting when the thrashers came into the neighborhood (in 1907)- as I remember the thrashing machine was powered by horses and ran by a man named Buck Bradshaw.” (see Arch D. Clapier Reminescent Memories) [70b]

In the first half of the Twentieth Century it was common for local farmers to use both horses and some gas powered machines on their farms.  Slowly, year by year, the gas powered tractors and machines improved and became the modern way.

Great Basin Antique Machinery demonstrated a restored gas powered thrasher that typified modern farming in the first half of the Twentieth Century; photo 2002 on Bingham/Stone farm.

Cutting hay with a Fergeson-Brown Type A tractor, 1936-37.

Warren Stone and Chet Jenkins cutting hay with a Fergeson-Brown Type A tractor, 1936-1937.

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NEW INVENTIONS – CARS AND CRACKERS

Commemorative stamp issued in 1916 summarized The Spirit of Progress in Weber County.

A decorative stamp printed in 1916 for Pioneer Day summarized The Spirit of Progress in Weber County, from pioneers to trains to automobiles.

George Smuin 1844-1913

George Smuin 1844-1913

George Smuin lived east of Washington Ave. and was friends with George Eccles who lived on 26th Street. Both men were excited about the new inventions they bought at the turn of the century:

“They were both business men and entrepreneurs and were always in friendly competition. George Eccles, one day, about 1910, bought the first automobile that Ogden ever had. He drove all the way down Washington Ave. to see his friend, George Smuin. It was on a Sunday, and he had all his family in his brand new automobile, and Geo Smuin saw the Eccles family drive up, and they were all so excited to see this automobile that had come to Ogden. As they sat there and ooohed about the new automobile, George Smuin said, “I have something better that what you’ve got.” And George Eccles couldn’t imagine that anything could be better than an automobile.
George Smuin said I want to show you something that I brought from Seattle. He took him into his house. George Smuin was the first person in Ogden to have a “cracker”, the first toilet. Those men were both excited about the new items that they had bought at the turn of the century. George Eccles took his new automobile back down Washington Ave. and a month later he had a brand new cracker in his house. Of course they didn’t have indoor plumbing at that time, so they would fill a tank full of water and get about 4 flushes to a tank. There was large tank on the back, and it was the responsibility of the women to bring the water every morning and fill up the tank of the cracker.”[70c]
Removal of the

After the coming of automobiles, the “Chinese Wall” was removed, a 6 inch wall on either side of the street car tracks between 2nd St. and 3rd St; now cars could pass over the tracks when necessary; photo c. 1920.

Chauncey & Edna Stone in “Our first car“; c. 1917.

James Allen and his son, Jimmy , at Five Points, c. 1937.

James Allen and son Jimmy with car at Five Points.

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BUSINESSES AT FIVE POINTS c. 1900-1936

Bill Watson and workers at Five Points

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 SALT LAKE VALLEY CANNING COMPANY

& PIONEER COAL AND LUMBER 

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The Salt Lake Valley Canning Company and Pioneer Coal and Lumber were built along side of the Oregon Short Line on the south side of 2nd Street (see map below) where Mountain America Credit Union, Butters Machine, and the 2nd Street Plaza are located in 2015.
The Pioneer Coal and Lumber company was started by the Randall family.  Gradually the company expanded and moved the office and lumber business to the NW corner of 2nd St and the Harrisville road extending into the area that is Key Bank in 2015; the coal business remained on the south side of 2nd St. in the original location.
In 1910 the SLV Canning building became The Superior Honey Company. Notice that 3rd Street West of Washington was called Walnut on the 1906 Sanborn Insurance map below:
EAST
img179EAST
Sites of Pioneer Coal and Lumber and SLV Canning (later Superior Honey)

TODAY: Sites of Pioneer Coal and Lumber and SLV Canning (later Superior Honey).

Pioneer Coal and Lumber; Francis, Cotty and Shorty Sully at work; photo c. 1930.

Pioneer Coal & Lumber; Cotty & Francis Sully and 3 friends; photo Myrtle Gamble, c. 1930.

Pioneer Coal & Lumber; Cotty & Francis Sully and 3 friends; photo Myrtle Gamble, c. 1930.

Pioneer Coal and Lumber was started by the Randall family.

Pioneer Coal and Lumber expanded to the N. side of 2nd St. and built an office on the NW corner of 2nd St and Harrisville Rd., facing Harrisville Rd.; photo Standard Examiner c. 1930.

1977 old office for Pioneer Coal & Lumber before demolition; photo G. Sherner.

Pioneer Coal & Lumber office on NW corner of 2nd and Harrisville Rd. in 1977, now used as a bank;  photo G. Sherner.

STANDARD EXAMINER FEATURED 7 PICTURES of FIVE PTS. BUSINESSES

c. 1936 

Enterprising Concerns Flourishing At Five Points.

(L to R): 1.Royal Baking Co.; 2.Five Points Drug Store, Wangsgards IGA Store, Bamwell Cash market and Lundgreen’s Feed store; 3. Sawyer Battery Manufacturing company, Joe Wangsgad Welding company and garage; 4. Pioneer Coal & Lumber company office; 5. Ben Maxfield service station; 6. Five Points cafe, Red & White Grocery store, A. E. Raymond Utah Oil service station 7. Superior Honey company, largest of its kind in the inter mountain territory.

The first business named Wangsgard at Five Points was a blacksmith shop. J. D. Wangsgard opened at 240 Washington Ave. His business is pictured above in the third photo and listed in about 1930 as Joe Wangsgard Welding Company and Garage. He operated this business until his death in 1936.[70d]

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MAGGIE HARROP STORE

Maggie Iverson Harrop Store, meals and hats, Washington & 3rd.

Maggie Iverson Harrop’s store sold meals and hats near Washington & 3rd.; photo courtesy Jerry Harrop.

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AUTOMATIC CONTROLLER AND UNIVERSAL SPOT WELDER 

HONORED IN SMITHSONIAN MUSEUM

Cleveland Redfield, 1916.

Cleveland Redfield, 1916.

In 1916 Cleveland Redfield of Five Points took a trip to Washington D. C. to obtain a patents on his invention: the Automatic Controller and Universal Spot Welder.  The Automatic Controller & Manufacturing Co. was located in Streeper Hall on the NE corner of Washington Ave. and 3rd Street. The Redfield spot welder was a huge success and brought public pride to the community; it was acclaimed in Detroit by car manufacturers and later was honored in the Smithsonian Museum.   In 1917 Cleveland started two companies at Five Points to manufacture electrical and other machinery and to conduct a general electrical service and sign business.[70e]

YESTERDAY - Streeper Hall on NE corner of Washington Blvd. and 3rd St. was home to the Automatic Controller and Universal Spot Welder; today Reed's Leather & Canvass Shop is located here

YESTERDAY – Streeper Hall on NE corner of Washington Blvd. and 3rd St. was home to the Automatic Controller and Universal Spot Welder; TODAY Reed’s Leather & Canvass Shop is located here.

Universal Spot Welder, invented and manufactured by Cleveland Redfield.

Interior of Streeper Hall where Redfield located the Automatic Controller & Manufacturing Co.;Oral A. Browning, Cleveland’s uncle, is using the Universal Spot Welder; photo c. 1920.

Another picture of Streeper Hall; mailman in the foreground.

Another picture of Streeper Hall; today’s Reed Leather & Canvas Shop located here; adjoining it is the Five Points Golden Rule store; mailman in the foreground.

TODAY - Streeper Hall is Read's Leather in 2011.

TODAY – Read’s Leather in 2011.

THE SUPERIOR HONEY COMPANY 1910

Fred Redfield started the honey business in his home about 1900. He kept his own bees and refined the honey on his kitchen stove. In 1910 he moved the business into the Salt Lake Valley Canning Co. building and called it The Superior Honey Company. The company grew, becoming one of the world’s leading producers and distributors of honey and honey-making equipment, but its headquarters remained in Five Points. The Ogden plant had the most modern facilities for the sterilization and filtering of beeswax.

The company’s main activities of processing and packing honey expanded to include the distribution of a complete line of beekeeping supplies. The company produced its own wooden articles, such as hives and frames, and the company developed the Superior Lifetime Honey Extractor, which was manufactured in Ogden and sold to beekeepers all over the world. At the South Gate, California plant, the company had candle manufacturing facilities for producing household, ornamental and church candles.

Another activity was the importing of olives from Spain, then processing and canning them at the Denver plant. Besides the Ogden, South Gate, and Denver plants, there were others at Idaho Falls, Phoenix and Madera, California. Fred Redfield was president, his brother-in-law, M. Spencer Stone, was general manager, his brother Jay Redfield was in charge of the Idaho Falls Plant, and his brother-in-law George A. Stone was in charge of the Madera, California plant.  Many other Five Point residents were involved as office managers, sometimes moving to other company positions in other states.[70f, includes NOTE on the fire that destroyed the building]

 In 1910 Fred Redfield bought the Salt Lake Valley Canning Co. and converted it into Superior Honey Co; photo 1950s.


In 1910 Fred Redfield bought the Salt Lake Valley Canning Co. and converted it into The Superior Honey Co; photo 1950s.

TODAY: Site of The Superior Honey Company.

MAP TODAY: Site of The Superior Honey  Company is the same as SLV CAnning on the N. side of 3rd St.

Site of Superior Honey 2015

Site of Superior Honey as viewed from 3rd St. in 2015.

MEAT MARKETS AND GROCERY STORES

Wangsgard Cash Grocery at 204 Washington Ave. started in 1919 by Peter and Mary Wangsgard.

John Bramwell started Bramwell Meat Market started in 1911; his sons Harold and Clarence took charge of the store about 1916. Letter D on far right is for David Shaw Grocery store.

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Meat markets were popular at Five Points. Two of the early meat markets were Harrop Brothers Meat Market, and C. W. Wright Meats – located at 205 Washington Ave in 1906. Peter Petersen was the cutter at C. W. Wright’s.

Harold Bramwell’s father bought stock in the Cardon Brother’s Market in about 1909, and Harold, age 15, was given a job there and taught how to cut meat. After two years the Cardon Brothers sold the meat market to Harold’s father and the grocery side of their store to David Shaw. Harold’s father called his new store Bramwell Meat Market. In 1919 Peter and Mary Wangsgard opened Wangsgards Grocery on the north side of Bramwell Meat Market, and the David Shaw Grocery was still located on the south side.

After serving in World War l and working in Oregon, Harold returned to the meat market at Five Points taking over the store. He put his brothers to work and entered the competition with several other meat markets that were starting up. The Shaws added a meat market to their grocery store so the Bramwells added groceries to their meat market. Wangsgard’s also put in meat, and there was much competition. Pete Wangsgard and Harold Bramwell each tried to outdo the other by cutting prices. Harold remembers one day selling butter 15 cents under cost. David Shaw went out of business and sold Harold his store. Harold enlarged and renamed his enlarged store Bramwell Cash Market in 1933.[70f]

Bramwell Meat Market expanded to Bramwell Cash Market; opening day turned out to be a very busy day; photo 1933.

The familiar corner at Five Points: F. P.’s Drug Store, Wangsgard’s, Bramwell Market and Lee Baker Garage plus trolley car; photo by Clyde Bramwell c.1935. (Notice the Southwell Bld. is now 2 stories high; the 3rd story was destroyed by fire in the 1890s.)

INDIANS AT FIVE POINTS

The number of Indian camps on 2nd Street declined over the decades, but Indians camping in pastures or on vacant lots were respected by the white people even into the 1920s. By the 1920s the Indians traveled from Washakie to Ogden camping overnight in fields in the Five Points area, often in the meadows of the Stone Farm. They caught rabbits and made fires in their camps. Many Indians knocked on the back doors of residents’ houses at Five Points asking for food, and they sometimes marked the fences to indicate which families would share. Anders and Alice Harrop Anderson built a brick house in 1881 at 259 2nd Street. Alice always fed the Indians continuing into the 1920s, and the Indians left a mark on her fence to tell other Indians that the people here were kind. [71]

1881 house of Anders and Alice Harrop Anderson, 259 2nd St.

1881 house of Anders and Alice Harrop Anderson, 259 2nd St; Indians marked the fence to show that the family here was kind to Indians; photo Weber County Recorder.

TODAY Anders Anderson house is part of a day care business at 259 2nd St.

TODAY Anders Anderson house is part of a day care business at 259 2nd St.

Helmer Anderson on 7th Street remembered that his mother would see the Indians coming into town in the 1920s and 1930s and start baking extra bread. One day in the 1930s some Indians herding sheep brought the herd through town and camped next to the Andersons on the vacant NW corner of Washington and 7th St.(today’s Maverick gas station). That night the sheep herders got mixed up with alcohol, allowing the sheep to wander. The next morning there were sheep scattered everywhere among Five Points businesses and even down 2nd Street.[71a]

REDFIELD DANCE ORCHESTRA 1900

Mrs. Sarah Browning Redfield trained and organized the Redfield Dance Orchestra that played for dances at Five Points and at other Weber County sites at the turn of the century.

The Redfield Dance Orchestra – Top row: Fred Redfield, Archer Anderson, George Stone, Chauncey Stone. Front row: Arthur Richards, Clyde Redfield, Carl Redfield.

Clyde Redfield practicing in the Redfield home.

Clyde Redfield practicing in the Redfield home.

LYNNE WARD

George Smuin 1844-1913

George Smuin 1844-1913

In 1900 there were 503 souls in the Lynne Ward, namely 13 high priests, 17 seventies, 34 elders, 17 teachers, 27 deacons, 279 lay members, 116 children under 8 years of age.  George Smuin served as bishop of the Lynne Ward for eighteen years, from 1889 – 1907.

Lynne Ward Sunday School c. 1906.

Two boys in front: unknown. Row 1: —-,—-,Elbert Drumiller, Walter Crowther, —-,—-,—-, —-. Row 2: —-, Grace Mills, Harriet? Sherner,—-,Rasmus Christofferson, Bishop George Smuin, Carl Turnquist, —-,—-,Lettie Shaw. Row 3: —-,—-,Ole Olson,William D. Shaw, Sherner,Thomas Irvine,Lawrence Sherner,—-,—-,(row shifts down)—-,Sherner,—-,—-,—-. Row 4: unknown (email us if you can identify someone, binghamsfort@gmail.com).

LYNNE WARD SPLIT – OGDEN 8TH WARD

In 1908 the portion of the Lynne Ward east of Washington Blvd. was joined to the newly formed Ogden 8th Ward. The 8th Ward met on the second floor of Streeper Hall on the NE corner of Washington Blvd. and 3rd St. until a new meeting house could be built.   Bishop Smuin and his counselors were released; the new bishop of the Lynne Ward was Carl Turnquist, with Walter Crane, Paul Christensen and Thomas M. Irvine as counselors (see 122 2nd St. for homes of Carl Turnquist and Thomas Irvine).  The bishop of 8th Ward was James Taylor with David Jensen and John P. Lefgren as counselors.[71b]

YESTERDAY – the second floor of W. H.Streeper Hall on NE corner of Washington Blvd. and 3rd St. was the temporary meetinghouse for Ogden 8th Ward; lower level was for the Redfield Spot Welder.

TODAY - Streeper Hall is Read's Leather in 2011.

TODAY – Streeper Hall is Read’s Leather in 2011.

The rear of Read's Leather reveals old brick where the stucco fell away.

The rear of Read’s Leather reveals old brick where the stucco fell away.

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6TH MORMON CHURCH at FIVE POINTS COMMENCED 1915

img211On September 5, 1915, under the  supervision of Bishop Carl O. Turnquist, a new Lynne Ward chapel was commenced on the triangle at Five Points; the architect was William W. Fife.  The red brick building was not dedicated until debt free in 1926 and was completed at the cost of $20,000.  The ward retained the old Crowley Hall for recreation and Scouting. Following Bishop Turnquist, Lawrence Sherner served as bishop from 1916 – 1925 (see 218 2nd Street).[71c]

YESTERDAY -new red brick Lynne Ward built in 1914; the name of the ward was changed to Ogden 15th Ward in 1923; photo G. Sherner.

TODAY – Bank of Utah; photo 2004.

By 1916 the community and ward members were suffering from sorrows of death and deformity from World War 1. Those who returned after the Armistice in 1918 faced a lack of work – Utah’s agrarian economy did not support many jobs.

Signing of the Armistice was celebrated by tying cans to this car owned by Cleveland Redfield and driving jubilantly up and down Washington Ave.

About this time the world flu epidemic came unbidden to Five Points, and nearly every family lost a family member to its scourge. Then prohibition became a political issue, and there was growing awareness of the erratic stock market. The men in the bishopric of the Lynne Ward were devoted servants to the community during these difficult times, and the new meetinghouse at Five Points was a real bright spot for the Mormons and many non Mormons too. It was a spacious building, well designed, located on the triangle next to Smoot Park. Ward meetings, interviews and social events were held here. Everyone was proud of the chapel. In 1923 the name of the ward was changed from Lynne Ward to the Ogden 15th Ward of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.[72]

Children sitting in back yard of their house located in today’s parking lot of Harmons; Lynne/ Ogden 15th Ward chapel in the background; photo courtesy Myrtle Gamble, 1944.

8TH WARD NEW CHURCH 7TH ST. AND ADAMS AVE.

8th Ward on the east side of Lynne also completed a new building in 1914 on the NW corner of 7th and Adams. George Smuin excavated for the building using a “Mormon Scraper” made of wood and pulled by horses to excavate the dirt.  Much of the carpentry work on the building was done by 4 Scandinavian carpenters, John P. Lefgren, Karl Edling, Henning Friedberg and Joseph Bjorklund.  It was dedicated  February 1, 1914, by President Joseph F. Smith.[72a]

8th Ward at 7th & Adams was also completed in 1914 and dedicated in Feb. by Joseph F. Smith.

YESTERDAY: 8th Ward building once stood on NW corner of 7th & Adams Ave.

In March 1914 the 8th ward presented this delicate cane as a gift to Mary Bjorklund.

In March 1914 the 8th ward presented this delicate cane as a gift to Mary Bjorklund.

Inscribed: Mary E Bjorklund, from 8th Ward, 3-26-14; photos courtesy Josh Morrell.

Inscribed: Mary E Bjorklund, from 8th Ward, 3-26-14; photos courtesy Josh Morrell.

LINCOLN  SCHOOL 1920s

In 1926 the 1891 Five Points School had a furnace but no lights or indoor plumbing. Students were still using water closets located north west of the main school. In about 1926 the school district updated the old building, added a large addition, and renamed the newly enlarged building Lincoln School.

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New addition to the old Five Points school was renamed Lincoln School.
1972 DEMOLITION of the 1890 Five Points school and the c. 1926 addition of Lincoln School; photo G. Sherner.

1972 DEMOLITION photo shows the 1890s Five Pts. School and 1920s Lincoln addition on the left.

REDFIELD ELECTRIC MOTOR WORKS 1930s

Cleveland Redfield, 1916.

Cleveland Redfield, 1916.

In the mid-1930s Cleveland Redfield established Redfield Electric Motor Works on the SW corner of Washington and 3rd Street next to his brothers Bicycle Repair Shop. Cleveland was an excellent electrician and inventor who generated businesses and jobs amid the tight times of World War 1 and the discouraging times of the Depression.  See 528 Washington Blvd. for details of the Redfield home.[72b]

314 Washington Ave., owned by Cleveland Redfield and Carl Redfield. Bicy Repair Shop owned by their brother, Clyde Redfield; photo c. 1942.

YESTERDAY: 314 Washington Ave., owned by Cleveland Redfield and Carl Redfield. Bicycle Repair Shop owned by their brother, Clyde Redfield; photo c. 1942.

Dragon Restaurant, 303 Washington Blvd.; photo Nov. 2011.

TODAY: Dragon Restaurant, 303 Washington Blvd. and Kent’s Sports Store, 307 Washington Blvd.; photo Nov. 2011.

Cleveland purchased the property above in 1942.  Cleveland’s son W. Byron Redfield was a partner in the business and was working there at the time of his father’s death on Nov. 16, 1956.  The property was subsequently sold to Roy Morris, then to Clarence Cole, who built the Four Leaf Clover Restaurant.  In 2015 the Dragon Restaurant and Kent’s Sport Store are in the location of the old Redfield stores.

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UTAH GENERAL DEPOT 1940

On September 27, 1940, the farms on 2nd Street west of the rail road tracks and east of 1200 West were purchased for the Utah General Depot. This shocking change deleted 1,678 acres of farmland.  Homes, cabins, barns and sheds had to be moved off the site.  To the east of the new depot the construction workers made an excavation pit on the old Sam Gates farm to obtain fill dirt to level the land for the construction of the depot, and they drained Stone’s Pond.  Pioneer homes along W. 2nd Street fell to clear way for the Defense Depot.

Map of the farms that became Utah General Depot in late 1930s

Early construction of the DDO; photo c. 1941

Early construction of the DDO; photo c. 1941.

The Defense Depot was used to store and ship food, clothing, textiles, packages, petroleum products, pesticides, pressurized gasses, and general medical, industrial, construction and electronic supplies.

DDO 2Workers stay busy in Defense Depot (left) and singer entertains crowd at the 80th ISU Company Christmas party at DDO (right.);                        photos Standard Examiner 27 June 2010.

Photo Standard- Exxaminer 27 June 2010

Photo Standard- Examiner 27 June 2010

The Utah General Depot housed Utah’s largest World War ll prisoner camp. 4,700 Italian and German prisoners of war were incarcerated here. It was the only one in the country in which German and Italian prisoners worked side-by-side. Many features, such as drainage culverts were constructed by these prisoners. Under the the watch of guards, the prisoners also worked as farm hands on local farms.[73]

WWll Italian POWs work in the depot.

WWll Italian POWs work in the depot.

In 1943 prison laborers from the adjacent General Depot were used on Stone farm.  The prisoners were transported under guard to the farm in a school bus, and they usually worked in groups of ten with a guard.  Prisoners were paid about eighty cents a day, and their meals were furnished by the army, but meals for the guards were furnished by the farmer.  At lunch time the prison laborers on Stone Farm sat on the steps of the Bingham granary to eat their lunch where they could gaze at a pasture and barn located to the west.[73a]

Norman Kent dressed in his best standing W. side of granary; circa 1910.

YESTERDAY : Bingham granary

Clyde and Macel Stone Montgomery built a brick home and attached it to the granary.

TODAY: Granary at 317 W. 2nd St.

One night some Italian prisoners escaped from the interment camp at the Supply Depot and made their way to Stone Farm where the Montgomery family lived in the Old Bingham Home.  Donna Montgomery Hill tells the story that unfolded:

  It was midnight and my sister Joyce and I were sitting by the kitchen window.  I saw a car with lights on drive to the barn and stop for a few minutes.  Then the car continued on quickly past our house on the dirt driveway and onto 2nd Street.  I woke daddy up and told him.  The next morning he went to the barn and found a pack of cigarettes, a green patch that said Italy and some other small things.  He gave me the patch.  We later learned that some Italian prisoners had escaped from the interment camp at the supply depot.[73b]

Painted image of the patch found in the barn; painting by Donna Montgomery Hill.

Painted image of the patch found in the barn during WW ll; painting by Donna Montgomery Hill.

TODAY: Montgomery Barn is listed on the National Register of Historic Places; photo 2009.

TODAY:The  Montgomery Barn, refuge of Italian prisoners, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places; photo 2009.

At the US governement’s urging, Chauncey Stone grew hemp on Stone Farm during WW ll.  He and Clyde Montgomery  were also among a set of farmers who organized with others to take care of Brother “Taki’s” farm while he was relocated to the Topaz War Relocation Center west of Delta, Utah. Taki was an American of Japanese descent who was sent to Topaz, “the prison for the innocent”. This injustice brought tears to the eyes of his friends. Every third day Chauncey Stone rode his tractor to Taki’s place and fed Taki’s chickens and cows. [73c]

REMOVAL OF SPUR TRACKS

In 1941 and 42 the residents of 2nd Street petitioned that the spur railroad track on the south side of 2nd Street be removed as it hindered access to homes. Henry James figured prominently in these petitions and hearings. Further reasons to remove the tracks included: 1) the change from light switch engines to heavy engines in recent years had caused vibration damage to houses. 2) A short truck haul to the railroad would be efficient for businesses that needed the railroad. 3) Cars were permitted to stand long periods of time on this track in front of the homes. 4) Cars were a hazard to automobile traffic and residents. 4) Improvements of a sidewalk and hard surfacing on the north side of the road could not be completed on the south side. The Union Pacific agreed in August of 1942 to remove the tracks and pave the roadway.[73d]

LOVE FOR FIVE POINTS’ MOUNTAINS

A second generation member of the Sully family returned from California for a visit and took this sentimental photo.

A second generation member of the Sully family returned from California for a visit and wrote these sentimental words on her photograph; photo courtesy Myrtle Gamble.

Hikers on the top of Ben Lomond Peak; photo c. 1940.

Made it to the top of Ben Lomond Peak by horse; Maxine Stone and Nellie Reno; photo courtesy David Montgomery c. 1940.

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ANOTHER BOOM AT FIVE POINTS 1940s

Water tower at Utah General Depot constructed in the 1940s.

Water tower at Utah General Depot constructed in the 1940s; photo 2006.

Five Points had another boom in the 1940s when the general depot was constructed and the Bonneville public housing project was completed. El Rancho and Rockcliff homes enhanced Five Points businesses and population. Scores of new houses were built north and east of the cross roads on old farms. Wangsgards cash grocery moved to the first floor of the Southwell building on the SE corner of Washington and 2nd Street in 1945. West 2nd Street was closed to public traffic at the entrance to the depot, and engineers soon constructed the water tower that was visible for miles in all directions.[73e]

Wangsgards grocery moved to the first floor of the Southwell building on the SE corner of 2nd and Washington Blvd. in about 1945.

Five Points and mountains c. 1949; in the 1940s children followed a pathway starting at the white fence, going past Royal Baking Co. center rear, and on to Lincoln School; photo courtesy Chrissy Orrell.

Bell Bakery on NE corner of Washington Blvd. & 7th St; photo c. 1949.

Bell Bakery on NE corner of Washington Blvd. & 7th St; photo c. 1949.

EXPANDED BRAMWELLS 1950s

Harold Bramwell was interested in new business adventures and expanded his 16 foot meat market everytime near-by property became available. He put in a smoke room and cold storage lockers. During deer season the store became a beehive of activity preparing venison to be stored in one of the cold storage lockers. After World War ll Harold’s wife and children helped run the store. Harold took more time off to farm on five acres which he bought at 212 N. Washington Blvd (location of Lowes in 2013); he sold ½ acre of that farm to George Osmond for his house. By 1957 Harold’s son Ken took over the Bramwell Market. In 1958 Alan, Wayne, Merrill and Jay Osmond began singing barber shop music for ward socials and local audiences.[73f]

Osmonds: Alan, Jay, Andy Williams, Merrill, and Jay.

Osmonds: Alan, Jay, Andy Williams, Merrill, and Jay. They started by singing for  local wards and audiences.

Bramwell Market on E. side of Washington Blvd. between 2nd and 3rd; photo c. 1945.

Bramwell’s c. 1955.

Old Five Point Drug (Southwell Building) c. 1955; rainstorms always flooded the Five Points intersection.

THE 6TH SCHOOL and NEW WANGSGARDS 1950s

The Lincoln School was abandoned for a new elementary school that was built on Grant Ave in 1953. This new school was named Lynne School (6th school, 3rd one named Lynne) and was located on Grant Avenue between 4th and 7th Street. In 1959 Wangsgards grocery store enlarged and built a new store on the NE corner at the intersection of Five Points.

The 6th school building and the 3rd one named Lynne School; built in 1953.

Wangsgards moved from SE corner to NE corner of Washington Blvd. and 2nd Street in 1959.

7TH MORMON CHURCH AT FIVE POINTS 1963

In 1962 the Ogden 15th Ward was 111 years old, and the new ward and stake center at 113 Childs Avenue was completed. The new building was a culmination of many transitions since the beginning of a ward on 2nd Street in 1851, and The Daughters of the Utah Pioneers dedicated a plaque to the history of the old Lynne Settlement and hung it on the exterior wall of the new stake center by the front entrance in 1963.

The building costs were $421 thousand and the donated man hours were about 19,500. It was dedicated in January 1964 by President N. Elden Tanner, first counselor in the First Presidency of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

1962 stake center for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In 2002 the Ogden 15th Ward name was changed to the Harrisville 8th Ward.

Dedicated by Daughters of the Utah Pioneers in 1963.

The Bank of Utah bought the old historic brick church on the triangle at Five Points.

The former Ogden 15th Ward became Bank of Utah; photo 1986.

Bank of Utah in 1986.

TODAY,Bank of Utah

TODAY: Bank of Utah; photo 2011.

—————————————————————————————————————————————-

GOODBYE TO LINCOLN SCHOOL, PIONEER COAL & LUMBER,

FIVE POINTS DRUG (SOUTHWELL BUILDING) 1970s

1972 DEMOLITION of the Five Points/ Lincoln School; photo G. Sherner.

1972 DEMOLITION; rear view of 1892 Five Points School;photo G. Sherner.

1977 – old office for Pioneer Coal & Lumber before demolition in Jan 1978; photo G. Sherner.

1977 June – Hello to Harmons and Key Bank; photo G. Sherner.

1987 – before demolition of Five Points Drug (Southwell Bld.); photo G. Sherner.

1987 – windows boarded up for demolition, building almost 100 years old; photo G. Sherner.

1987 demolition of Five Points Drug; photo G. Sherner.

TODAY: SE corner of Washington Blvd. & 2nd St.

TODAY: SE corner of Washington Blvd. & 2nd St.

In 1972 the Lincoln School was demolished, and today this location is the site of Union Gardens. In 1977 Pioneer Coal and Lumber office was demolished, and Harmons and Key Bank began construction that same year; Key Bank was built in the location of the old lumber yard. In 1987 Five Points Drug (Southwell Building) was demolished, and today this location is the site of Ogden Animal Hospital.[73g]

OLD LYNNE NAME ON NEW BUSINESS 1980s

In the mid 1980s Don Higgs opened a mobile home court north of the Romrell Park on 4th Street. He named it Lynn to fit in with the community and also to honor his son. The location of the court was next to the Lynne Ditch, one block north of the third Lynn School, and his son’s middle name was Lynn. It still bears this name in 2015.[74] Another business that still bears the name Lynne in 2015 is the c. 1870 Lynne Irrigation Company.

TODAY: 333 Childs Avenue; named for the Lynne Community and the owners son.

AN OLD BUSINESS – WANGSGARDS 1919-2015

Phillip Childs, owner of Wangsgard, remodeled and enlarged the 1959 store in 2001 and 2013. This grocery store started in 1919 and is the oldest continuous business at Five Points today.  In May 2015 Ridleys Family Markets purchased Wangsgards, and on Sept. 12, 2015, Wangsgards moved to the former Harmons building

2001 remodel.

June 2013

June 2013 remodel.

Sept. 12, 2015

Sept. 12, 2015.

Sept. 12, 2015

Thank you for almost 40 years o f service…

Wangsgards in new location Sept. 2015.

On Sept. 12, 2015, Harmons closed and Wangsgards opened in the former Harmons building.

BUSINESS DEPOT OGDEN 1997

The water tower landmark of the former Defense Depot Ogden is now icon for Business Depot Ogden.

The water tower landmark of the former Defense Depot Ogden is now icon for Business Depot Ogden.

 The Defense Depot of Ogden operated for more than fifty years.  During that time farming continued on 2nd Street in the four block area between Wall Avenue and the Defense Depot Ogden until the late 1990s when the DDO was purchased by Ogden City for the Business Depot Ogden.  The formal sale took place in 1997.  [75] With this surprising change from an army depot to a business park, property values escalated and most of the old pioneer farms on West 2nd were sold from 1995 to 2007 for subdivisions with the exception of the 40-acre Bingham/Stone farm which was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2003.

This photo taken from the water tower in BDO shows construction continuing on the Barnes Aerospace building in 2008 and in Fort Bingham subdivision; photo Nick Short/Standard Examiner 27 June 2010.

This photo taken from the water tower in BDO shows construction continuing on the Barnes Aerospace building in 2008 and in Fort Bingham subdivision; photo taken from water tower by Nick Short/Standard Examiner 27 June 2010.

2 SUBDIVISIONS on WEST 2ND ST. 

ASPEN ACRES 2000

ASPEN ACRES subdivision located on old pioneer farm.

ASPEN ACRES subdivision is located on an old pioneer farm; construction began in 2000.

Aspen Acres Subdivision 2000

ASPEN ACRES Subdivision begins at intersection of 2nd and Lynne School Lane and extends northward.

The Aspen Acres subdivision started in 2000 on the Stone/Reno farm. Before the new Lynne School Lane was graded and paved, there was an excavation of the old Lynne School foundation, sifting through the dirt to find artifacts.  This was made possible through the generosity of Carl Nelson of Nelson Intermountain Crane.  Sagebrush consultants did the survey of the old historic site and cataloged the artifacts.

Excavation of foundation of old Lynne School; photo Oct. 2000.

L: rock foundation of old Lynne School; R: volunteeers sifting through the dirt; photos Oct. 2000.

FORT BINGHAM SUBDIVISION 2004

Fort Bingham subdivision began in 2004 on the Gates/Stone farm.  One hundred sixty years ago there were Indian wicki-ups in straight lines between the cottonwood trees that grew on Sam Gates’ farm – a novel contrast to the neat rows of houses built on the same land beginning in 2004 and still proceeding in 2013. [76]

Century Dr. was first road of Fort Bingham subdivision; Indian tree on left; photo 2004.

Century Dr. was first road of Fort Bingham subdivision; Indian tree on left was located at today’s address of 145 Century Dr.; photo 2004.

First houses built in Fort Bingham subdivision near Indian tree; photo 2005.

Early houses built in Fort Bingham subdivision near the Indian tree; photo 2005.

GOOD BYE TO THE INDIAN TREE NOV. 2005

Cutting of the tree begins.

1. Cutting of the tree begins.

One chunk at a time.

One chunk at a time.

Bit by bit

Another branch hits the dust

Beam me up please

Beam me up please

Surveying the job

Surveying the job

Cutting the trunk

Cutting the trunk

Over she goes

Over she goes

Measuring the trunk

Measuring the trunk

For historic accounts of the Indian tree see Indian Camp Road.

7TH SCHOOL 2008

The Heritage School, named for the rich heritage of the area, replaced the  1950s Lynne School on Grant Ave. and became the 7th school of the Five Points community.  Its location is only two blocks south of the first 1853 Bingham School House.

7th School of the area is Ogden’s public school named
Heritage Elementary for the rich historic heritage
of the community; opened 2008.

HERITAGE HOMES STILL HAVE FEEL OF OLD UTAH

Twelve pioneer houses, the Bingham/Stone Farm, and other historic residences and outbuildings still remain on 2nd Street from Five Points to the Business Depot Ogden as seen in adobe granaries, wooden barns and updated farm houses. A history of each house and the farm is listed on the home page.  Next to Fort Buenaventura, the 1851 farm is the oldest site in Weber County.[77]

Article from Standard Examiner 1999- Foundation rocks of Bingham Fort’s wall discovered:

img730

img732

img736

Article from Standard Examiner in 2002- Widening 2nd Street between Wall Ave. and the Ogden Business Depot turned up remnants of a house and artifacts dating from 1858 to the 1880s:

img305img306

The location of the remnant of a 15 foot wall of a house as described in the previous article is by the ghost cabin above.

Copper plate found in 2002 excavation for sidewalk, dated between 1858 and 1880.

IF YOU HAVE PHOTOS OR STORIES YOU WOULD LIKE TO CONTRIBUTE TO THIS HISTORY, PLEASE CONTACT US AT <binghamsfort@gmail.com>.

——————————————————————————————————————————

[70a] Andrew Jensen, History of the Lynne Ward, p.1.
[70b] Arch D. Clapier (1902-1993) Reminiscent Memories, Written down by Josee Clapier Fenstermaker Lake and son.
[70c] Interview James I. Lefgren, October 27, 2001.
[70d] Standard Examiner, Death Claims J. D. Wangsgard, June 16, 1936.
[70e] Pearl Stowe, Ogden Utah 8th Ward, Lorin Farr Stake, 1908-1980, 1985, p.315,317.
[70f] Ibid, p. 323. NOTE: The Superior Honey Co. building burned down in about 1954.  A troubled young man that was “mad at the world” started the fateful fire and later confessed and was arrested.  The judge gave him the option of going to jail or joining the army, and he chose the army.
[71]Interview with Hazel Anderson Gunnison, February 22, 2002.
[71a] Interview with Helmer (Tug) Anderson, August 16, 1999.
[71b] Ida Mae D. Hipwell, OGDEN UTAH WEBER NORTH STAKE HISTORY, c. 1990, p. 292.
[71c] Ibid, p. 292, 293.
[72] Colleen Blankenship, Lawrenc William Sherner, manuscript, 2004, p.4; History of the Ogden 15th Ward, p. 13; Museum Memories, International Society Daughters of Utah Pioneers, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009, Vol. 1, p. 366.
[72a] Pearl Stowe, Ogden Utah 8th Ward, Lorin Farr Stake, 1908-1980, p. 53, 92, 295.
[72b]  Ibid p. 313,-318, 320; interview Jimmy Lefgren Oct. 27, 2001.
[73] Richard C. Roberts and Richard W. Sadler, A History of Weber County, p. 251, 311; Susan Snyder, Residents Cry Foul at Defense Depot, Ogden Standard Examiner, Feb.21, 1999; DDO, Ogden Standard Examiner, June 3, 2005; DDUO History Book, 1996, Kinara Graphis, Inc., Ogden, Utah, p.9-11.
[73a] Richard C. Roberts and Richard W. Sadler, A History of Weber County, p. 268.
[73b] Donna Montgomery Hill, Memories, manuscript, 2010, p. 1 and Memories, 2015, drawing and map.
[73c] Interview Bernell K. Stone, February 27, 2012.
[73d] Standard Examiner, Second Street Track Repairs Are Promised, August 26, 1942.
[73e] Standard Examiner, Boom at Five Points, c. 1945.
[73f] Joyce B. Maw, Biography Harold Bramwell, p. 18-21; interview Jimmy Lefgren, October 27, 2001; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Osmonds#The_Osmonds.27_Story (3-16-2012); http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Osmonds (5-31-13).
[73g]  Wangsgards and Harmons sold to Ridley’s in spring/summer of 2015.
[74] Interview Don Higgs Aug. 5, 2008.
[75] Jeff Demoss, Standard Examiner, Bounty of the Depot Awaited, Feb. 27, 2005, p. E1.
[76] Autobiography of Sarah Stone Brown Crowther (1872-1963), manuscript typed 1959, p.1.
77] Charles F. Trentleman, Road Contruction Unearths Old Fort, Standard Examiner, 2002.

2 Responses to “1900 – present”

  1. GLENDA COLLINS said

    I LOVE these entries. Thank you to all who did the hard work of compiling and writing this.

  2. David Lefgren said

    Thanks for the memory tour for part of my youth.
    David E. Lefgren

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